Arts and Media

Good Morning Monday: Steve Jobs' Zen Teacher

To be born on this earth is to have the whole thing. From the beginning there are precise distinctions between things, but the whole thing is yourself. That is how it started. When we become deeply involved in precise discrimination between things for a long time, we forget our original self. We do not lose that original nature, but we forget. To sit is to recover that original nature fully, and to stay with it for a while. Kobun Chino Roshi

Good Morning Monday - Buddhism in the Kitchen

Eric Ripert, chef and owner of Le Bernadin, a famous NYC Michelin-rated restaurant, said recently:

I have applied good principles of Buddhism with the employees of Le Bernardin . . . [and] in the way of having more simplistic presentations than having something complicated on a plate. It’s also more about the respect of the ingredients and the respect of the animals that have been killed and served to the clients—that’s probably where Buddhism had most impact.

Laurie Anderson takes on the Buddhist View of Death and Bardo in New Film

Laurie Anderson and her deceased husband, Lou Reed, were both students of the Tibetan Buddhist teacher, Yongey Mingur Rinpoche.  IDP Blog Writer, Nancy Thompson wrote a wonderful post here, describing how they used their Buddhist practice to prepare for Lou's death, and how their practice enabled them to love and support each other through his illne

Off the Cushion and Onto the Dance Floor

"It's a meditation," the dance instructor says, coaxing me to relax and follow him in the tango.

How to love the scared and scary ones

How do you love someone who is scared and who scares you?

I was reminded of this question, posed by Tsoknyi Rinpoche in his book "Open Heart, Open Mind," this week as I watched the Internet react to what we might term "difficult people" in our metta practice -- Kim Davis, the Kentucky county clerk who refused to issue marriage licenses to gay couples, and a Connecticut woman who filmed the bears who followed her on a walk in the woods.

Daniel de Sosa's Cosmic Cat

Daniel de Sosa is an American-born comics artist living in the United Kingdom inspired by science fiction, heavy metal, screwball comedy, and Buddhist tales and traditions. Like many artists too irreverent or weird to secure corporate patronage, he is attempting to launch his next project, Purrvana, through Kickstarter. (Full disclosure: I, Emerson Dameron, have pledged to his project.)

Is Zayn Still in One Direction in a Pure Land?


Buddhism is often seen these days as a supremely rational philosophical system or belief system, depending on your stance. Investigate everything, the Buddha said. Do not believe anything just because I tell you it is so -- look into it for yourselves and see whether it is.

Meditation For the Win

One of the reasons for meditating -- sitting still and focusing on an object, such as the breath -- is to train in tapping into the calm space in your awareness so that you can find that space in the midst of chaos.

Like on stage during the National Geography Bee.

Buddhism's Good Rep

A new study reports that merely reading Buddhist terms in a word puzzle -- such as dharma, Buddha, and awakening -- increased the likelihood of "prosocial" behaviors among study participants, some of them familiar with Buddhism and others not.

You Can't Win Meditation

We're entering heavy sports season here in the U.S., with the month-long college basketball championships wrapping up -- March Madness that now extends into April -- and playoffs looming for professional basketball and hockey, even as baseball opened its season Monday.

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