Meditation Practice

LOVE This Quote from Karmapa on Relationships

 

While prepping the syllabus for my  fall online course via Interdependence Project, The Journey of Relationships, I came across this quote from the Karmapa (head of a major Tibetan Buddhist lineage) on his Facebook page about taking responsibility for our part in relationships:

Practicing Forgiveness - Part 2 of 2

Teacher: 

 

Is forgiveness a practice?  If so, how do we do it?   IDP's Senior Teacher, Ethan Nichtern, recorded live at Nalandawest in Seattle, leads a talk on how to use our practice to open our hearts and minds and practice forgiveness for ourselves and each other.

 

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Practicing Forgiveness - Part 1 of 2

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Teacher: 

Is forgiveness a practice?  If so, how do we do it?   IDP's Senior Teacher, Ethan Nichtern, recorded live at Nalandawest in Seattle, leads a talk on how to use our practice to open our hearts and minds and practice forgiveness for ourselves and each other.

Audio: 

You may need: Adobe Flash Player.

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PodcastBuddhismMeditation Practice

Set Your Intention for 2013

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‎"Whatever we're doing could be done with one intention. That intention is that we want to wake up, we want to ripen our compassion, and we want to ripen our ability to let go. We want to realize our connection with all beings."  Pema Chodron

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Podcast: Setting an Intention for the New Year

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Meditation Makes Horse Sense

 

Practicing dharma is not difficult; it comes naturally. It is free from hassle, and it brings a lot of health. As you practice more and more, you find that practice begins to grow inside your bones, in the marrow. Practice becomes natural. It is just like a horse that is used to being ridden: that horse begins to like the rider rather than feeling resentful. That is why we sometimes call practice “riding the mind.”

Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche, from 'The Profound Treasury of Knowledge, Volume Three: The Tantric Path of Indestructible Wakefulness'

Meditation Makes Horse Sense

 

Practicing dharma is not difficult; it comes naturally. It is free from hassle, and it brings a lot of health. As you practice more and more, you find that practice begins to grow inside your bones, in the marrow. Practice becomes natural. It is just like a horse that is used to being ridden: that horse begins to like the rider rather than feeling resentful. That is why we sometimes call practice “riding the mind.”

Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche, from 'The Profound Treasury of Knowledge, Volume Three: The Tantric Path of Indestructible Wakefulness'

Mindful Approach To How Often Kids Should Get Dessert

When my kids ask if they can have ice cream, a couple of things happen.  My body tenses and I try to push the question away.  When that gets me nowhere, I mentally note their recent dietary intake and attempt conviction by responding with a "no."  When I catch myself doing this, and take in their award-winning looks of despair, I occasionally change my mind and fork over the frozen gold.

3 Tips for Practicing Meditation in the Office

Wherever we are, we have the ability to be present. On the meditation cushion, we can be present with the physical sensation of our breathing. Off the meditation cushion, we can be present with the people we encounter, our morning commute, the food we eat, everything. That is the purpose of meditation practice: to become more present and aware of every aspect of our life. 

Kindness & Compassion Training Meditation Retreat intro talk Part 1

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As qualities inherent in every human being, compassion and loving-kindness can be developed and cultivated through practice and training.  With effort, each and every person can learn to be more compassionate, kinder, and more patient.

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The Two Arrows

I've been thinking about how relationships, mindfulness, and meditation work.  All of them seem to share a striking characteristic.  When everyone is happy, they all seem to flow easily.  But when someone is feeling a strong emotion (e.g., anger, fear, jealousy, sadness), they all seem to get harder. This is perhaps one of the real benefits of working on mindfulness in a supportive group -- it's not like we're leaving the world behind.  We bring it with us all the time.  Meditation offers us an opportunity to practice the hard things in a little simpler and safer way, so that then we can practice them in the "real" world more easily later.

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